Handling:
Buffalo are not cattle. They need to be handled with respect and distance.

If you are loading or unloading,  give them time and space. The more you crowd them the more frantic and faster they become. Any wire gates should have something on them that the buffalo can see. Like plastic or wood. If they can't see it being solid they will try to go though it., there by injuring themselves.

At home in the new pen. let them set for a couple of days to get over the journey there and their new surroundings. Maybe leave the arena gate open for them to go in and out of on their own. If you are turning them out to pasture, make sure they understand where the feed (grain) & water is kept. (gathering pen) .If you have enough calves, you might want to only turn out half of them first. They will want to stay with the ones that are still penned.

Do Not Work them the first day you get them !!!!  With all the articles, video
and advertising, believe it or not  there are still people out there working them off the truck.
I cannot stress enough on how much damage you are doing to the calves and your own reputation.
If you are interested in calves,please let us know in advance.
If you are buying from  another source please ask about their age, weight and
health care. You don't want to get someone else's mistakes from last  year.
There are people out there buying a few head from sale barns and piecing together
loads. Be careful about what you are buying. Do the heifers have bangs tags?
Can the seller produce a health sheet for the calves?  How long has the seller
been in the business?
When these animals started becoming "the new thing" a lot of people jumped on
board to make a fast buck. They don't care where they come from or how you take
care of them and they are not buying them back as yearlings. If you are thinking of
buying some and are not sure of the seller, just give us a call and we will help
answer any questions you might have. You do not have to buy our calves to get our
help. Texas does not require Bangs  on the heifer calves, although we do. Because as yearlings they cannot be shipped out of the  state without them. You limit your selling options. If the Rancher has not gone to the extent to Bangs heifers, Did they bother to give any calfhood vaccinations?  We have also have been informed of a horse rancher who now has gone into the buffalo calf business, they do not have a clue as to what they are doing and have sold some of what they brought in through sale barns. (no bangs tags). Buyer beware.
         Buffalo work very well after being broke, however if this process is not done right they usually cannot be fixed. If you have bought any from a sale barn, were they handled by horseback? Now what is the buffalos perception of horses that you are wanting to train? If a calf has ever been injured or sick, they don't work the same. We have found no difference between bulls, heifers or steers on their work habits. Buffalo grow very slow, unlike cattle and it would be easy to mistake a weak yearling for a new calf. We have seen yearlings that actually weighed less than the calves we were picking up. Please feed a good quality horse grass, grain & worm your buffalo.
This is an example of a poor fed calf . He is the same age as the yearlings next to him believe it or not. We actually have gotten back animals that weighed less a year later than when we sold them. There is no excuse for this.  Buy quality & raise quality.
Frasier Bison still markets bison calves to cutters, but only as a small part of our business and mostly as a service to herds we help.
 
We hope it's a 'win-win' .

* We understand the needs and realities of both the bison calves and the cutter as customers.

* We acknowledge the cutter-market as an addendum market-strategy for mid and light weight calves    to the     benefit of the bison industry.

* We only sell groups of 4-5 head to customers for reasons outlined in our company code of ethics.

* We strive to teach bison producers how to build relationships with cutters.

* We only sell wormed and vaccinated calves, well weaned and coming to feed. 

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